Born King (2019), by Agustí Villaronga – Review

Long life for productions as important and effective as this one, that dress Spanish cinematography with long shots and raise their international level.

The taste for historical films has been renewed thanks to technology, which makes truthfulness and fidelity before impossible. From the trick to the digital treatment of the image recorded today, the differences and virtues have evolved in the same way that craftsmanship did when reaching the status of art, even more. That does not take away to find beautiful films for their finish, such as Dunkirk, which, however, remain in mere flourish of visual perfection. The aspect only counts in a part of the stories and, if it is as good as the one already mentioned, it helps the narration but does not solve it; the emotion of the course of events is obtained by making films and putting all the elements at the service of the story and not vice versa.

Born king It fulfills the conditions with its good work in all orders, although it may lack a spark of interest to ascend to the category of memorable. Its direction and production are impeccable, the story, however little known, interests, the story nevertheless goes around the novel without becoming a film completely.

It has, of course, memorable moments, splendid invoice and direction, but some major interest is lacking that makes it possible to be seen as more than a good reconstruction of historical facts. If so, it would be embroidered.

Villaronga's mastery is for its narrative versatility, as well as for the direction of actors, who, without being front-line, interpret their roles perfectly and, above all, in favor of the work, forming a cast that moves in the only desirable direction, count the vicissitudes of the future king.

It has memorable moments, splendid invoice and address, but some major interest is lacking that makes it possible to be seen as more than a good reconstruction of historical facts.

Negotiating with Lord Curzon and Wiston Churchill, as we are described, should not have been very affordable for a brave young man but with an uncertain future, but choosing to make prime history about filmmaking is where the film resents and slows down. Perhaps to pass faster on that moment and bring us the life and death of the future king, with the abrupt end that I had to live at the hands of a mentally disturbed nephew who ended up being executed, would have been a more interesting option, although I suspect that peculiar family should not be able to expand anyone who wants it, under penalty of being crossed out and attacked with the power of their omnimous power. Villaronga still ends up briefly telling what would happen to him in a quick news report.

We must highlight the work in the photography of Josep María Civit, who greatly elevates her to the category of impeccable, as well as Françoise Fourcade in her costume design and both Anna Cassina and Cyrus Patel in the direction of Production and Alison Riva in his artistic direction, who did not reap the Goyas that nevertheless deserved.

Long life for productions as important and effective as this one, that dress Spanish cinematography with long shots and raise their international level.


Synopsis The extraordinary story of Faisal, little son of the first king of Saudi Arabia. In 1919 Lawrence of Arabia and John Philby fought in their own way to defend England's interests in the Arabian Peninsula. While Europe was immersed in the frantic atmosphere after World War I, Faisal with only 13 years, is sent on a diplomatic mission to England having to negotiate with Lord Curzon, Churchill and making friends with the Royal Family.
country Spain
Address Agustí Villaronga
Script Henry Fitzherbert
Music Hesham Nazih
Photography Josep M. Civit
Distribution Adbullah Ali, Ed Skrein, Laurence Fox, Ruben Ochandiano, Hermione Corfield, Lily Newmark, James Fleet, Kenneth Cranham, Aidan McArdle, Lewis Reeves, Paul Reid, Dilyana Bouklieva, Celyn Jones, Manoj Anand, Atul Sharma, Lampros Kalfuntzos, Pablo Raybould , Elena Valdameri, Marina Gatell, Tuncay Gunes
Gender Drama
Duration 109 min.
Original title Born to King
Premiere 03/13/2020

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