The Invisible Man (2020), by Leigh Whannell – Criticism

Yes to the classic of H.G. Wells It gives a spin, the timely promotion and a proper distribution, it becomes a safe bet. If, in addition, as in this case, the script accompanies, the tape is acceptable.

Cecilia (Elisabeth Moss), a thirty-year-old architect, lives battered and harassed by her boyfriend (Oliver Jackson-Cohen): a rich bad, very bad, optical world-renowned. Tired of the situation of abuse to which she is subjected, she decides to escape from the love nest (stereotype of casoplon of the thrillers), with the help of her sister, to take refuge in the home of a cannon shot (Aldis Hodge), ideal cop of death and perfect padrazo. In the house of the African-American muscular, he recovers little by little, until very rare things begin to happen to him after the death of his ex. As they will suppose and it is customary, neither the nor Tato (the handle comme ci comme ça), so, the poor, ends up in a madhouse victim of the hooligans and the bad milk that her ex-boyfriend has that, far from being dead, has become invisible (although not incorporeal) and has nothing better to do than make him bitter Cecilia's life. He passes the songs and, hey, they have to manage to get out of the quagmire with real cunning and cold blood.

The invisible man It keeps you in tension and does not bore you, which is already a lot. I would have risked more.

Yes to the classic of H.G. Wells It gives a spin, the timely promotion and a proper distribution, it becomes a safe bet. If, in addition, as in this case, the script accompanies, the tape is acceptable. On the other hand, to be an invisible man of the 21st century, the special effects could have been cured a little more, because means to do so, today, there is more than enough for everyone to drop the drool. The plot keeps you alert and you spend two hours in a step. The actors are good without going into excellence and the outcome smells like Hitchcock that backs out. Start well, continue to regulate and end with the intensity of the principle, therefore, approve by far. As for the buts, shy psychological edges are glimpsed (at Basic Instinct) although they only sniff away and do not deepen, perhaps because of the director's fear of risking too much. However, the temita gives for this and, if the cards are played well, the roll, they could have gone great and loyalty for a reasonable time to the viewer (but, it is not the case). I want to say that, when a film gives rise to the approach of philosophical and ethical dilemmas such as: What would I do if I were invisible? Would I do evil, mischief, or, on the contrary, would I maintain an impeccable behavior despite my power? That abstruse itching is what I think you should be left as a hangover after viewing a work like this, when they show you fictional facts, such as invisibility, that are not part of our day to day. Daring to play with the public's mind is a challenge and, in this case, Leigh whannell He has not undertaken it.

Elisabeth Moss, the prota, he does well, the truth, and his anguish is quite credible. His gestures, his gaze and his gestures infect the viewer making him live his continuous unease. Aldis Hodge, in his role as protector, he falls well since he appears and meets from beginning to end and, as for the secondary, nothing to highlight.

The invisible man It keeps you in tension and does not bore you, which is already a lot. I, as I said before, would have risked (or spent) more with special effects and psychological dyes, but lately, American cinema is taking it with smoking paper.


Synopsis Cecilia remakes her life after receiving the news that her ex-boyfriend, a hardened abuser, has died. However, his sanity begins to falter when he begins to be certain that he is still alive.
country U.S
Address Leigh whannell
Script Leigh whannell
Music Benjamin Wallfisch
Photography Stefan Duscio
Distribution Elisabeth Moss, Storm Reid, Harriet Dyer, Aldis Hodge, Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Zara Michales
Gender Fantastic
Duration 124 min.
Original title The Invisible Man
Premiere 02/28/2020

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