The Lighthouse (2019), by Robert Eggers – Review

With a lighthouse on a rock in the middle of the ocean and two lonely characters, Eggers builds a tremendous work full of valuable and exciting elements.

Only a genius could do a prime opera like The witch (2015), but now we know that there are people capable of making a classic in the next release in their filmography. Robert Eggers has gone from being a young promise in the direction to being an absolute master of horror movies in just two films.

I do not want to skimp on praise or pretend to be fatuous before a film that aroused so much attention since its great reception at the last Cannes Film Festival. The lighthouse It is a beastly wonder and I can assure you that its striking, minimalist appearance, with the black and white and the practically square screen remain as mere anecdotes compared to the fascinating story that is told behind.

The enormous visual charm lengthens and widens
in the space left by its only two protagonists, including these.
Silences, faces and gestures accompanied by drastic paneling and disturbing
symmetries veiled by tremendous photography and sound, just remember
Bergman and Tarkovsky and yet we are facing something unique. Of course
this terror is going to be the least conventional you can imagine, you can't, of
In fact, categorize such a tape. There is no path, there are no scares or climax like
such, but what is surprising as never before.

The lighthouse It is a beastly wonder and I can assure you that its striking appearance is as mere anecdote compared to the fascinating story that is told behind.

It's weird, yes, and the weird sometimes ends up getting tired. In The lighthouseHowever, and as I said, there are two extreme people who catch you and don't let you go. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe fight each other to see who makes the most memorable performance of recent times. I would say that they tie in excellence (although Dafoe has one of the most impressive monologues I have ever seen in my life) and it can be said that they are delivered in body and soul to represent that climbing of madness so exciting to see from the armchair.

With a lighthouse on a rock in the middle of the ocean and
two lonely characters Eggers builds a tremendous work full of
valuable and exciting elements. It is the second seal of this titanic film:
a particular narrative that offers as many senses as theories and
interpretations the viewer wants. From a clear reference to the myth of
Prometheus we can distort until we tell a story about two drunkards
despair on an island, and in that huge hole we find light and shadows,
the monsters and the "lovecrian" passions, the siren songs and the guilt of
a man who sometimes looks in the eyes of his enemy. It is disturbing, of course,
but it had been since the first roar of the ship and the face of
Pattinson's character concern.

It would be a blessing to see how many times it takes to understand all the symbolisms and stories they wanted to tell, but it would be especially for experiencing a nightmare as special as it is again. The lighthouse.


Synopsis A remote and mysterious island of New England in the 1890s. Veteran waiter Thomas Wake and his young assistant Ephraim Winslow must live together for four weeks. Your goal will be to keep the lighthouse in good condition until the relay arrives that allows them to return to land.
country U.S
Address Robert Eggers
Script Robert Eggers, Max Eggers
Music Mark Korven
Photography Jarin Blaschke
Distribution Willem Dafoe, Robert Pattinson
Gender Terror
Duration 110 min.
Original title The lighthouse
Premiere 01/10/2020

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