The officer and the spy (2019), by Roman Polanski – Review

A sovereign film about the constant persecution of man and the immediate expiration of freedom (in) attainable.

A historical and always persecuted Roman Polanski returns with a robust and unhindered film in many of his senses. The officer and the spy she is so sober and cold as little daring; It does not illustrate too much and yet it is technically and narratively formidable.

Surrounded by titans of the film world,
The film advances like an imperious and elegant parade. Polanski's pulse
next to the photograph of his friend Pawel Edelman, distant and framed music
(almost diegetic) by Alexandre Desplat and the precise costumes of Pascaline
Chavanne, all this work does much more than half of the complete work.
But in a real case like Dreyfuss's, much more was needed than
Only the technical experience.

History will carry it behind him
character of Colonel Georges Picquart, who investigated the case of insatiable
the alleged betrayal of his Jewish student to the French army. It is a point of
canonical view and a select narrative that, however, offers nothing more
interesting to accompany the actor Jean Dujardin in his performance of the
anguish to discover more and more in the plot of private letters
that reaffirm the innocence of Dreyfuss. A somewhat bland performance (and a protagonist
without much evolution), but really remarkable coming from a comedy actor.

The officer and the spy she is so sober and cold as little daring; It does not illustrate too much and yet it is technically and narratively formidable.

The formality and suspicious lucidity of Polanski will bore the viewer somewhat with nerve and desire to fear, fearing that perhaps all that mess of the I accuse (J’acusse) of the original title will remain in nothing (such as complaints against the Polish director who is branded as a pedophile). To me, however, the parallel that interests me is what I see with Alejandro Amenábar's film, While the war lasts, where the protagonist is Unamuno and where that crusade was quite interesting in such a complicated military and political context.

In The officer and the spy Émile Zola is that "Unamuno", but it only has one scene (the one of the trial) and it vanishes in an end that is dismantling all the firm work of previous investigation. And it is in this third act of history that we see what it was all about, that fleetingness of the verve and the duty of a person. In the movie the loss of honor comes a step before suicide, the rejection of a hand request continues with the automatic resignation of the gentleman and the limit of the companionship ends when it affects your own job.

Everything is dry, without pretending to reopen
controversies (except the intention or not of the director in real life) and, in
In general, it is still a powerful story and an impeccable work in functions. A
sovereign film about the constant persecution of man and the immediate
expiration of freedom (in) attainable.


Synopsis In 1894, the French captain Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish officer, is accused of treason for spying on Germany and sentenced to life imprisonment on Devil's Island, in French Guiana. Among the witnesses who made this humiliation possible is Colonel Georges Picquart, in charge of leading the counterintelligence unit that discovered the spy. But when Picquart learns that military secrets continue to be passed on to the Germans, he will enter a dangerous labyrinth of lies and corruption, endangering his honor and his life.
country France
Address Roman Polanski
Script Roman Polanski
Music Alexandre Desplat
Photography Pawel Edelman
Distribution Jean Dujardin, Louis Garrel, Emmanuelle Seigner, Grégory Gadebois, Hervé Pierre, Wladimir Yordanoff, Didier Sandre, Melvil Poupaud, Eric Ruf, Mathieu Amalric, Laurent Stocker
Gender Drama
Duration 126 min.
Original title J’accuse
Premiere 01/01/2020

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